Alkaline phosphatase normalization is associated with better prognosis in primary sclerosing cholangitis

Primary sclerosing cholangitis results in elevated but fluctuating serum alkaline phosphatase levels that occasionally return to normal.

To investigate the frequency of normalization of alkaline phosphatase in newly diagnosed primary sclerosing cholangitis patients and the subsequent clinical outcomes.

Records of newly diagnosed primary sclerosing cholangitis patients were examined retrospectively for laboratory values and clinical end points (cholangiocarcinoma, liver transplantation and death) within 10 years of diagnosis. Data from a recent prospective ursodeoxycholic acid treatment trial were also studied.

Eighty-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. Normalization of alkaline phosphatase was seen in 35 (40%) patients. Five (14%) patients with normalization reached an end point whereas 17 (33%) of the patients with persistent elevation reached an end point (P = 0.02). Ursodeoxycholic acid was used similarly by both groups. When the investigative criteria were applied to a prospective trial, there was again a significant relationship between normalization of alkaline phosphatase and survival in patients receiving ursodeoxycholic acid (P < 0.01) and the placebo group (P = 0.02).

Serum alkaline phosphatase was found to normalize in a high proportion of newly diagnosed primary sclerosing cholangitis patients. This was significantly associated with a better prognosis in a retrospective cohort and when data from a prospective treatment trial was evaluated

Digestive and Liver Disease
Volume 43, Issue 4, April 2011, Pages 309-313

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